This is a “Portrait of an Egyptian woman with her child” (1875) by Konstantin Makovsky (1839 - 1920).

Makovsky was born to the family of an artist. All children in the family became less or more known artists. Makovsky is famous for his beautiful and colorful portraits. His art is absolutely decorative and some don’t like him for that, but he was a wonderful portraitist. Not only he could see the beauty, he could easily capture it in his works.
As an artist he received great recognition and fame during lifetime. His works received several medals at World Fairs and were very popular. He let his art be artistic.

This is a “Portrait of an Egyptian woman with her child” (1875) by Konstantin Makovsky (1839 - 1920).

Makovsky was born to the family of an artist. All children in the family became less or more known artists. Makovsky is famous for his beautiful and colorful portraits. His art is absolutely decorative and some don’t like him for that, but he was a wonderful portraitist. Not only he could see the beauty, he could easily capture it in his works.
As an artist he received great recognition and fame during lifetime. His works received several medals at World Fairs and were very popular. He let his art be artistic.

Happy Marc Chagall’s birthday everyone!

"Birthday" (1915)

P.s. I have already mentioned him here: http://artvecher.tumblr.com/post/70413768290/this-is-one-of-my-favourite-works-by-marc-chagall

Happy Marc Chagall’s birthday everyone!

"Birthday" (1915)

P.s. I have already mentioned him here: http://artvecher.tumblr.com/post/70413768290/this-is-one-of-my-favourite-works-by-marc-chagall

This beautiful watercolor was painted by Vasily Surikov (1849 - 1916) and it is called “Naples” (1900).
I chose this work just because it was something I didn’t ce spect from the artist.


Surikov did a lot for Russian art. He was a wonderful portraitist as well as a great historical painter. During his studies at the Imperial Academy of Arts in Saint Petersburg he earned himself a nickname “The composer” because he would always pay the greatest attention to composition in his paintings. He got famous with his monumental historical paintings dedicated to Russia’s past.  He enjoyed great recognition during his lifetime.

His last words were:”I’m disappearing…”

This beautiful watercolor was painted by Vasily Surikov (1849 - 1916) and it is called “Naples” (1900). I chose this work just because it was something I didn’t ce spect from the artist. Surikov did a lot for Russian art. He was a wonderful portraitist as well as a great historical painter. During his studies at the Imperial Academy of Arts in Saint Petersburg he earned himself a nickname “The composer” because he would always pay the greatest attention to composition in his paintings. He got famous with his monumental historical paintings dedicated to Russia’s past. He enjoyed great recognition during his lifetime. His last words were:”I’m disappearing…”

This is “Chemin de fer” (roulette) painted in 1915 by a Russian poet and graphic artist Vladimir Mayakovsky (1893-1930) during his student years. Mayakovsky studied to be an artist but got a great recognition as a poet. It is really hard to translate his poetry. It’s absolutely unique. It is as unusual, as recognizable and as special as Mayakovsky himself. He was revolutionary and his poetry was revolutionary as well. It was avant-garde. Mayakovsky’s poetry has to be felt. I love Mayakovsky. He loved women and the state. But they abandoned him in the end. Sadly, he committed suicide at the age of only 37.

Today I stumbled upon a quote that comes from one of his poems. It goes something like this:

"Lonely am I as the very last eye
Of a visitor to the blinds.”


Can you feel it?

This is “Chemin de fer” (roulette) painted in 1915 by a Russian poet and graphic artist Vladimir Mayakovsky (1893-1930) during his student years. Mayakovsky studied to be an artist but got a great recognition as a poet. It is really hard to translate his poetry. It’s absolutely unique. It is as unusual, as recognizable and as special as Mayakovsky himself. He was revolutionary and his poetry was revolutionary as well. It was avant-garde. Mayakovsky’s poetry has to be felt. I love Mayakovsky. He loved women and the state. But they abandoned him in the end. Sadly, he committed suicide at the age of only 37.

Today I stumbled upon a quote that comes from one of his poems. It goes something like this:

"Lonely am I as the very last eye
Of a visitor to the blinds.”


Can you feel it?

This picture is called “Russian Venus” (1926) and it is by Boris Kustodiev. I think that Kustodiev was one of the most outstanding Russian artists ever. His works are full of light and brightness, they are humorous but sincere. I’ve already mentioned Kustodiev once here: http://artvecher.tumblr.com/post/68273970467/this-a-self-portrait-1912-painted-by-boris

As for this beautiful Venus. Venus (or Aphrodite as the Greeks called her) is an ancient Roman goddess of love and beauty. Kustdev portraits here a beautiful though ordinary Russian girl bathing. She’s smiling at as. She’s naked but she’s not hiding from us. She’s ordinary but she reminds us of Botticelli’s Venus - same red hair, similar pose, similar gestures though this one looks less fragile and full of life. 
Such girls were considered to be very beautiful because they were strong and healthy. And that mention that they could beget easily and bring many healthy children into this world. And that fact was the most important.

In the low right corner there is a leaflet saying “Russian Venus” and the date of work. In the corner on the left you will notice the girl’s clothes being laid on a bench and a beautiful winter landscape being seen through the window.

This picture is called “Russian Venus” (1926) and it is by Boris Kustodiev. I think that Kustodiev was one of the most outstanding Russian artists ever. His works are full of light and brightness, they are humorous but sincere. I’ve already mentioned Kustodiev once here: http://artvecher.tumblr.com/post/68273970467/this-a-self-portrait-1912-painted-by-boris

As for this beautiful Venus. Venus (or Aphrodite as the Greeks called her) is an ancient Roman goddess of love and beauty. Kustdev portraits here a beautiful though ordinary Russian girl bathing. She’s smiling at as. She’s naked but she’s not hiding from us. She’s ordinary but she reminds us of Botticelli’s Venus - same red hair, similar pose, similar gestures though this one looks less fragile and full of life.
Such girls were considered to be very beautiful because they were strong and healthy. And that mention that they could beget easily and bring many healthy children into this world. And that fact was the most important.

In the low right corner there is a leaflet saying “Russian Venus” and the date of work. In the corner on the left you will notice the girl’s clothes being laid on a bench and a beautiful winter landscape being seen through the window.

This one is by Victor Vasnetsov (1848-1926) a Russian painter and architect. He was born to a priest’s family in a small rural village. At the age of 18 he moved to St.petersburg to study Fine Arts at the Imperial Academy of Arts. After completing his studies travelled abroad and spent som time there. Vasnetsov is famous for painting Russian folklore stories and fairy tales.

The one you see above is called “Knight at crossroads”. (1882)
A knight traveling across the land stumbles upon a “teller-stone”. The stone is predicting what will happen if the knight doesn’t turn back. So he has to make the choice.

Carvings on the stone say: “If you go to the left - rich you will be. If you go the right - the spouse you will find. If you go straight - your won’t survive. There’s no way and no road for any passer by, for any rider by and any flyer by”.
What would you choose?

This one is by Victor Vasnetsov (1848-1926) a Russian painter and architect. He was born to a priest’s family in a small rural village. At the age of 18 he moved to St.petersburg to study Fine Arts at the Imperial Academy of Arts. After completing his studies travelled abroad and spent som time there. Vasnetsov is famous for painting Russian folklore stories and fairy tales.

The one you see above is called “Knight at crossroads”. (1882)
A knight traveling across the land stumbles upon a “teller-stone”. The stone is predicting what will happen if the knight doesn’t turn back. So he has to make the choice.

Carvings on the stone say: “If you go to the left - rich you will be. If you go the right - the spouse you will find. If you go straight - your won’t survive. There’s no way and no road for any passer by, for any rider by and any flyer by”.
What would you choose?

Today is the 9th of May. Here in Russia we celebrate the victory over Nazi Germany in the course of the World War II. It’s a very important date because for people here it’s the end of the Great Patriotic war as well. The nazis attacked then the USSR unexpectedly and furiously. No one was prepared. The war took away lives of dozen millions of people. Literally every family in Russia was affected by the war and many lost their beloved ones. Thank God that some veterans are still alive and the memory still lives. So I’d like to dedicate this one to the occasion. 

This is a picture by Konstantin Antonov (born 1924) and it is called “Victors” (1985). This picture shows us a part of the Victory parade that took place in 1945. Soldiers march along the Red Square in Moscow with trophy flags in their hands. These men have survived horrors of the war and now they are the victors.

As for Konstantin Antonov. He went through the war himself. In 1941 he entered the Moscow academy of arts but only several days after the war started. Right before the end of the war he got severely injured and had to go stay at hospital. Today his works can be found at Tretyakov gallery in Moscow.

Today is the 9th of May. Here in Russia we celebrate the victory over Nazi Germany in the course of the World War II. It’s a very important date because for people here it’s the end of the Great Patriotic war as well. The nazis attacked then the USSR unexpectedly and furiously. No one was prepared. The war took away lives of dozen millions of people. Literally every family in Russia was affected by the war and many lost their beloved ones. Thank God that some veterans are still alive and the memory still lives. So I’d like to dedicate this one to the occasion.

This is a picture by Konstantin Antonov (born 1924) and it is called “Victors” (1985). This picture shows us a part of the Victory parade that took place in 1945. Soldiers march along the Red Square in Moscow with trophy flags in their hands. These men have survived horrors of the war and now they are the victors.

As for Konstantin Antonov. He went through the war himself. In 1941 he entered the Moscow academy of arts but only several days after the war started. Right before the end of the war he got severely injured and had to go stay at hospital. Today his works can be found at Tretyakov gallery in Moscow.

Pavel Fedotov (1815 – 1852) was an amateur Russian painter known as a Russian Hogarth. He was a professional military officer but as many other people of his time had a great interest in art.
Not willing to spend his whole life in the army he retires and comes back to Moscow but not finding any support from his family Fedotov moves to StPetersburg. Fedotov’s works were recognized as a new word in art at the exhibitions of 1849 and 1850 in St. Petersburg and brought the painter success that promised his prosperity and, hence, the possibility to continue his work. Unfortunately his close ties to the Petrashevsky social-democratic group who went on trial made him a target of government persecution. This persecution seriously undermined his health. Not being able to recover Fedotov dies in a mental clinic at the age of only 37 years.

The picture you see here is called “Difficult bride” (1847).
This is an illustration to a satirical poem by Lafontaine. A young woman was so picky about her potential husband that denied every candidate. As a result the maiden got so old for a “good” groom that had to accept an old and ugly humpback. But her chances for at least any marriage (not mentioning a successful one) were so low that now she’s quite happy with her choice. Bride’s parents (who are very old) on the left also deserve being noticed. They pray and thank Heaven that their daughter is FINALLY getting married.

Pavel Fedotov (1815 – 1852) was an amateur Russian painter known as a Russian Hogarth. He was a professional military officer but as many other people of his time had a great interest in art.
Not willing to spend his whole life in the army he retires and comes back to Moscow but not finding any support from his family Fedotov moves to StPetersburg. Fedotov’s works were recognized as a new word in art at the exhibitions of 1849 and 1850 in St. Petersburg and brought the painter success that promised his prosperity and, hence, the possibility to continue his work. Unfortunately his close ties to the Petrashevsky social-democratic group who went on trial made him a target of government persecution. This persecution seriously undermined his health. Not being able to recover Fedotov dies in a mental clinic at the age of only 37 years.

The picture you see here is called “Difficult bride” (1847). This is an illustration to a satirical poem by Lafontaine. A young woman was so picky about her potential husband that denied every candidate. As a result the maiden got so old for a “good” groom that had to accept an old and ugly humpback. But her chances for at least any marriage (not mentioning a successful one) were so low that now she’s quite happy with her choice. Bride’s parents (who are very old) on the left also deserve being noticed. They pray and thank Heaven that their daughter is FINALLY getting married.

I sincerely apologize for not posting for a while, been really busy. Anyways, I’ve changed my workplace a few weeks ago and there they have on display two pictures by Henryk Siemiradzki (1843-1902). Siemiradzki is known for working in Academism style when it was almost already out of fashion. Nevertheless his paintings were really popular and made him world famous.

The picture you see above is called “Christ and Sinner”. Here we see everything Siemiradzki got famous for: wonderful composition, bright colors and light, biblical subjects. The picture is full of sun and air. It was the very first picture the artist finished after moving to Rome as a pensioner of Imperial Academy of Arts.

I sincerely apologize for not posting for a while, been really busy. Anyways, I’ve changed my workplace a few weeks ago and there they have on display two pictures by Henryk Siemiradzki (1843-1902). Siemiradzki is known for working in Academism style when it was almost already out of fashion. Nevertheless his paintings were really popular and made him world famous.

The picture you see above is called “Christ and Sinner”. Here we see everything Siemiradzki got famous for: wonderful composition, bright colors and light, biblical subjects. The picture is full of sun and air. It was the very first picture the artist finished after moving to Rome as a pensioner of Imperial Academy of Arts.

This is Sky fight (1909) by Nikolas Roerich (Nikolai Rerich) (1874-1947) who was a painter, writer, traveller, archaeologist and philosopher. Roerich is best known for depicting Russia’s ancient past. During the WW I he was among activist who tried to preserve architecture and different forms of art from damage. For that he earned several nominations for the Nobel Peace Prize. In 1917 he was basically forced to flee Russia after disagreeing with new government’s politics. After spending some time in London and New-York, Roerich and his family move to Asia, travel a lot and finally settle in India.
The picture you see depicts sky. Less than one fifth of the picture is occupied by land’s image. Sky takes up all the place here. We see skies of grey and golden, we see deep and pale blue, sometimes it’s thick and other times it is almost transparent. It looks like the storm is coming or has just gone away. It’s a fight. A fight between the Good and the Evil, a fight between forces we can not see but can feel.

This is Sky fight (1909) by Nikolas Roerich (Nikolai Rerich) (1874-1947) who was a painter, writer, traveller, archaeologist and philosopher. Roerich is best known for depicting Russia’s ancient past. During the WW I he was among activist who tried to preserve architecture and different forms of art from damage. For that he earned several nominations for the Nobel Peace Prize. In 1917 he was basically forced to flee Russia after disagreeing with new government’s politics. After spending some time in London and New-York, Roerich and his family move to Asia, travel a lot and finally settle in India.

The picture you see depicts sky. Less than one fifth of the picture is occupied by land’s image. Sky takes up all the place here. We see skies of grey and golden, we see deep and pale blue, sometimes it’s thick and other times it is almost transparent. It looks like the storm is coming or has just gone away. It’s a fight. A fight between the Good and the Evil, a fight between forces we can not see but can feel.